Pagan Lifestyle

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Pagan Lifestyle

Post by WarriorPrincessDanu on Thu Nov 12, 2009 10:46 pm

Does your religion affect how you live your day-to-day life? Why or why not? If so how? Do you think different Pagan religions have different effects on the lifestyles of their adherants? Is there a "stereotypical" Pagan lifestyle? If so, what do you think it is? Anything else you'd like to add?

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by AutumnalTone on Thu Nov 12, 2009 11:36 pm

Well, I embrace the virtues noted in the ancient writings, best as I understand them. Of course, I found those to match up with what I regarded as virtues prior to landing as Canaanite, so I'm not certain it made much difference.

Beyond that, there are no daily observances that require any great amount of time, nor any restrictions on normal life.

As there is no generic Pagan religion, there also isn't any generic (or stereotypical) Pagan lifestyle.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by John T Mainer on Fri Nov 13, 2009 2:34 am



I guess I would have to say my religion shapes my daily life. Odin called me as a warrior, so I serve my folk as a soldier. I am gifted as a healer, so I serve in the community as a first aid attendant. I was given three beautiful daughters, so I teach them all that I know, while protecting and providing for them as I can.

Faith gives you the understanding of the duties that are yours. Asatru is just more upfront about it.

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by Gorm_Sionnach on Fri Nov 13, 2009 1:09 pm

Like the other two fellows, ethical conduct is paramount to my day to day life, as is fulfilling my duties and upholding my oaths, both to the Gods I serve and the people I love, and those I work with. (Its a recon thing Wink). Then again I've always been a fairly ethical individual so I already fit that bill, so to speak. I do spend an awful lot of time reading, writing, debating and discussing aspects of my religion and CR in general, which is something I'd not be doing were I member of another religion.

As far as day to day activities, I have my devotionals, leave offerings, ocasionally sing praises if the mood hits me. Certainly the way I interpret UPG is going to differ grately from another who does not share my understanding of what means what, in such a context the way one understands cosmology can result in a significantly different understanding of even mundane events.

There is of course a difference between Pagan religions, as the "point" of an individuals life may vary depending on their religious outlook and if they ascribe to a specific teleological posistion, so difference between individual belief, actions and so on is likely to vary. As for "generic Pagan" life sytle, good luck with that one, we'd need a definitive meaning for what Pagan encompases before we could get to the niceities of what a Pagan "does".

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by WarriorPrincessDanu on Fri Nov 13, 2009 2:38 pm

A quick clarification: What I was trying to get at with the "stereotypical Pagan lifestyle" question was is there a stereotype that non-Pagans have about how Pagans live their lives? You know, the sort of people who say things like, "You're Pagan? But you're not a goth/hippie/etc." So I guess what I'm really asking is what do you think society (and the media) think is a "Pagan lifestyle?" How do you respond to the people like in the example above?

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by DotNotInOz on Fri Nov 13, 2009 4:02 pm

WarriorPrincessDanu wrote:A quick clarification: What I was trying to get at with the "stereotypical Pagan lifestyle" question was is there a stereotype that non-Pagans have about how Pagans live their lives? You know, the sort of people who say things like, "You're Pagan? But you're not a goth/hippie/etc." So I guess what I'm really asking is what do you think society (and the media) think is a "Pagan lifestyle?" How do you respond to the people like in the example above?

These questions are very difficult if not impossible to answer. Much would depend upon where someone lives as to how they'd be answered.

In my part of the country, "pagan" generally means "non-Christian" and implies the standard destination for anyone not a Christian. As for Pagan as a religion, I don't know that very many people have a concept of what that means. If they do, probably along the lines of animal sacrifice and drinking blood...in short, what Satanists are presumed to do.

As far as any image that society in general or the media might envision as a Pagan lifestyle, I'm not sure that there is one. I don't think that Paganism is recognized yet as a familiar religion, not enough so that there's much of an image in most of the U.S. anyway.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by Gorm_Sionnach on Fri Nov 13, 2009 4:55 pm

WarriorPrincessDanu wrote:A quick clarification: What I was trying to get at with the "stereotypical Pagan lifestyle" question was is there a stereotype that non-Pagans have about how Pagans live their lives? You know, the sort of people who say things like, "You're Pagan? But you're not a goth/hippie/etc." So I guess what I'm really asking is what do you think society (and the media) think is a "Pagan lifestyle?" How do you respond to the people like in the example above?

You essentially nailed a few of the stereotypes:

1. Goth
2. Hippie

I would add:

3. D&D/ Ren Faire nerd
4. Malicious baby killer
5. A combination of 1-4

Then we get into particular strains, like white supremacist's being associated with Germanic or Celtic recons.

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by MaineCaptain on Fri Nov 13, 2009 5:09 pm

DotNotInOz wrote: I don't think that Paganism is recognized yet as a familiar religion, not enough so that there's much of an image in most of the U.S. anyway.
That and the fact the Paganism is an umbrella term for many different and varied religions not a religion in and of itself.

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by Davelaw on Fri Nov 13, 2009 5:34 pm

Gorm_Sionnach wrote:
WarriorPrincessDanu wrote:A quick clarification: What I was trying to get at with the "stereotypical Pagan lifestyle" question was is there a stereotype that non-Pagans have about how Pagans live their lives? You know, the sort of people who say things like, "You're Pagan? But you're not a goth/hippie/etc." So I guess what I'm really asking is what do you think society (and the media) think is a "Pagan lifestyle?" How do you respond to the people like in the example above?

You essentially nailed a few of the stereotypes:

1. Goth
2. Hippie

I would add:

3. D&D/ Ren Faire nerd
4. Malicious baby killer
5. A combination of 1-4

Then we get into particular strains, like white supremacist's being associated with Germanic or Celtic recons.

my answer is variation of Gorms as seen from the view point of Fly Over country a Pagan is:
A) a free love hippie
B) a baby killing practitioner of dark magic
C) or the neighborhood wise lady/herbalist/cat lady/poisoner (and no they are not all negative and yes, some are almost mutually exclusive)
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by sacrificialgoddess on Fri Nov 13, 2009 10:14 pm

I never understand questions like this.

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by WarriorPrincessDanu on Sat Nov 14, 2009 12:56 am

Perhaps I can help clear things up (well, at least as far as why I'm asking such questions). In the church I grew up in, god really only existed in the church building on Sunday mornings. For these people, their religion had no effect on their lives other than that they didn't get to sleep in on Sundays. So, the idea that religion can be relavent outside of "church" (using the term VERY loosely here) is still a very foreign concept to me. I'm just trying to get a better understanding of how religion can affect daily life, and since I'm Pagan, I thought it would be most relavent to me to ask other Pagans.

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by Gorm_Sionnach on Sat Nov 14, 2009 1:08 am

WarriorPrincessDanu wrote:Perhaps I can help clear things up (well, at least as far as why I'm asking such questions). In the church I grew up in, god really only existed in the church building on Sunday mornings. For these people, their religion had no effect on their lives other than that they didn't get to sleep in on Sundays. So, the idea that religion can be relavent outside of "church" (using the term VERY loosely here) is still a very foreign concept to me. I'm just trying to get a better understanding of how religion can affect daily life, and since I'm Pagan, I thought it would be most relavent to me to ask other Pagans.

Wow, I'm at an utter loss... why bother with what amounts to a charade of religion at all? Was (is) it social/ cultural pressure?

Anyway, and keep in mind I am speaking in very generalized terms, most Pagans who are active in their religious practices, generally "live" their religion. Paganism is for the most part experiential (whether it be UPG, ecstatic rituals, meditation, spell work, etc.) as opposed to being revealed or "faith based" (I realize these concepts blend to some degree) actions are generally more important than beliefs, so to speak. So there is often a specific behavioral framework which accompanies the ritualized aspects, not to mention a particular world view, so to speak.

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by DotNotInOz on Sat Nov 14, 2009 1:47 am

What Gorm said basically, except that it seems rather unfair to tar the others who went to your church with what appears to be your view of its relevance. It's difficult indeed for me to believe that it had no more influence upon anyone's life than compelling them to be in church on Sunday.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by WarriorPrincessDanu on Sat Nov 14, 2009 2:07 am

You're right, my statement was too general. I will say that those I came into contact with (with the exception of one family) fit the description I gave. I would also say that it would describe most of the people I've known.

Also, I wouldn't say that this is necessarily my view of religion's relavence to daily life. This was the view that was presented to me, and for most of my life it was the only one I knew of. I did adopt it for a time, but this was because I didn't know any different.

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by gillyflower on Sat Nov 14, 2009 8:41 am

To be fair to church goers, around here, and especially for African Americans, many people's social lives revolve around the church. They go to church on Sunday for hours and eat there, too, often going back again after a short break for the evening. They go on Wednesday nights. They expand it by joining something like the Masons or Eastern Star, they catch up with the doings (gossip) of the various churches (and the people in them) at work. They go to funerals, visit the hospitals, carry food to the sick. It's like a full time job outside of their place of work. Women pray for a husband who is willing to join the church and participate in the lifestyle. So I would say that it does affect their daily life. There is intense social pressure, if nothing else, to behave in a certain way. If you asked them, it's all due to Jesus.

(And as an aside, it is why it gay African American men have such pressure on them to pretend to be straight and cheat on the "down low": there is no place for them in the social structure and they have to give up it all up to be openly gay, at least in this area.)

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by DotNotInOz on Sat Nov 14, 2009 4:04 pm

Good points, Gilly.

I'd sometimes stop in at a hatmaker's shop where we used to live mostly to watch the older black women select a new "crown" for churchgoing. The place made wonderful hats, but most of them were waaay out of my price range at $70 and higher. It was great fun surreptitiously watching (and listening to) these women chatter away about which hat would glorify Jesus most. (What they really meant, I suspect, was which one would put everyone else's hat to shame.)

I have a marvelous scarlet hat I blew a wad of cash for there with a wide swoop of a brim that I wear when I'm feeling frivolous, but it's nowhere near as spectacular as those ladies' hats. Makes me feel like someone from a Cole Porter song, though. Something about a magnificent hat that makes a person feel truly elegant.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by Willowcreek70633 on Sun Nov 15, 2009 9:42 pm

WarriorPrincessDanu wrote:Does your religion affect how you live your day-to-day life? Why or why not? If so how? Do you think different Pagan religions have different effects on the lifestyles of their adherants? Is there a "stereotypical" Pagan lifestyle? If so, what do you think it is? Anything else you'd like to add?
I do not have a "relgion" in the common sense of the word. My day to day life is a part of my path I choose to walk. From awaking in the AM, even through the course of the day, & how I choose to welcome the night, is a lifestyle that nourishes my mind, body & spirit. I think that different Pagan's have different paths that they walk & their lifestyles a lot of the times parralel their beliefs. As far as the "sterotypical" Pagan lifestyles. Well just call me an old fogie, but the young pagans I've met are more "structured" in thought. Us old fogies, are a bit more "accepting". Very Happy
Here in SWLA, we are small in #'s a little help from our Hurricanes to displace, misplace, & replace members of our Pagan community. Before our Hurricanes we were gathering, celebrating, @ a local business or having seasonal gatherings @ each others homes, or parks, (city folk, come out to the country for a day of rest & relaxation) We were on our way trying to start a food bank clothes bank for fellow Pagans in need. Our Pagans are government workers, military connected, police, business entrepenuers, teachers, tech designers, gay community, straights, & bi's, families, singles, young, old, children, & grandparents, a little bit of everyone & everything. We all try to respect each others individuality, & sameness. Our gatherings & fun times have been slim to none, but we keep in touch & play catch up. cheers
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by Willowcreek70633 on Sun Nov 15, 2009 9:46 pm

Very Happy DOT, the days of dressing up in your Sunday best! I love hats! farao santa king queen rendeer jocolor geek Angel Party2
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by john5180 on Fri Dec 11, 2009 3:33 pm

WarriorPrincessDanu wrote:A quick clarification: What I was trying to get at with the "stereotypical Pagan lifestyle" question was is there a stereotype that non-Pagans have about how Pagans live their lives? You know, the sort of people who say things like, "You're Pagan? But you're not a goth/hippie/etc." So I guess what I'm really asking is what do you think society (and the media) think is a "Pagan lifestyle?" How do you respond to the people like in the example above?

I was never aware that there was a particular "life style" about my religion. Like anyone else, I worship my deities, and others their's. Now, like John M. I too was called to serve my community. I do this as a part time soldier in the National Guard... I also served actively in the Army. I have worked in Emergency Services, and in law enforcement....(what I choose to call protecting those who are vulnerable to others). However, so far as outward appearances go, I look pretty much the same as any other citizen walking down the street. There is no dress code that I must follow, or anything else that would distinguish me from the public. I do tend to live a lot more "green" than my neighbors. I'd rather grow and harvest my own food. I hunt and fish to supplement as well. I do not kill for the sport of it, for I believe all life is sacred, and this is projected in my daily life.

So far, those who I have told what my beliefs are have been more curious than skeptical. Once they get past the belief that (a) I do believe in gods, even if not in the same fashion as they, (b) we don't sacrifice babies or pets, and (c) do not believe in an god of evil, such as Satan, I then find myself explaining the differences between the Hollywood stereo-type and the real Pagan. The stone walls that I do get placed before me are no different than a Christian believer of a different denomination. And of course, everyone wants to believe their religion is the best. Where they become flustered is when I agree that their brand of belief is perfect for them, as mine is perfect for me. They seem to get upset when I refuse to engage in the who's is better, your's or mine in real life. I prefer to save those discussions for the debate boards.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by DotNotInOz on Fri Dec 11, 2009 4:28 pm

Willowcreek70633 wrote:Very Happy DOT, the days of dressing up in your Sunday best! I love hats! farao santa king queen rendeer jocolor geek Angel Party2

Yeah, Willow, there was something kind of special about getting dressed up and putting on a hat to go to church.

Oddly, once the Catholics quit requiring that women and girls wear some kind of hat, I got to where I rather liked wearing hats. I used to HATE having to wear one to go to Mass when I was a kid except for Easter when Mom made it a special "girls go shopping" thing for her, my kid sister and me to pick out nice Easter hats.

One thing that hubby and I have in common is that neither of us will go to a wedding or funeral without putting on nice clothes. We've seen people at funerals especially wearing some of the most gawdawfully casual clothes I've ever seen! Both of us think that's disrespectful.

Guess we must be old farts showing our age, huh?
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by john5180 on Fri Dec 11, 2009 8:00 pm

Dot... this old fart figures that the highest form of paying respect to someone who has passed over, or a young couple getting married and starting a new page in their lives, (or any other social event held without a rod/reel, or deer stand) is to care enough for a shower, and more than casual attire. For me, it also requires that I shave and put my teeth in so that I don't come off looking like Gabby Hayes. LMAO!

I'm sure when Willow sees this she'll agree.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by sacrificialgoddess on Sat Dec 12, 2009 11:08 am

Dang it! Now I want a new hat!

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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by DotNotInOz on Sat Dec 12, 2009 3:26 pm

SG, next time you get up to Wichita, stop in at Hatman Jack's on W. Douglas. That's the place.

Hubby got the coolest fedora there. He looks terrific in a hat anyway, but that one looks especially debonair on him.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by DotNotInOz on Sat Dec 12, 2009 3:32 pm

john5180 wrote:Dot... this old fart figures that the highest form of paying respect to someone who has passed over, or a young couple getting married and starting a new page in their lives, (or any other social event held without a rod/reel, or deer stand) is to care enough for a shower, and more than casual attire.

Hoo, boyee! I'm getting some really disturbing images of John out deer hunting in his best suit, tie, long-sleeved white dress shirt and his daddy's cufflinks. affraid

I think it says something that schools are finding that students behave better and get better grades overall when the school requires them to wear uniforms or has a strict dress code that is rigorously enforced.
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Re: Pagan Lifestyle

Post by TigersEyeDowsing on Sat Dec 12, 2009 3:50 pm

Every year @ church we do the Gospel According to Nordstrom.

While at first it seems like appearance, it's about how you make other people feel.

The Gospel According to Nordstrom

“The congregation sat hushed, unusually attentive even for a church in which they were accustomed to hearing powerful preaching. There had been speculation all week due to the sign in front of the imposing structure that proclaimed a sermon on the unlikely theme of “The Gospel According to Nordstrom.” Although members of this prosperous flock were no strangers to the Nordstrom in their neighborhood, they couldn’t imagine what this mecca of merchandising had to do with Gospel principles.

“The homilist, Reverend Carolyn Crawford, skillfully evoked the luxurious and bustling atmosphere of a Nordstrom store during the holidays. She recounted the sights of abundant decorations; the sounds of holiday music expertly performed by an elegant tuxedoed piano player; the aromas of potpourri and expensive perfume; the crowds of shoppers laden with parcels. This shared reverie was jarred, however, when Reverend Crawford introduced an improbable character to the scene; a bag lady clad in torn filthy clothes.

“Convinced that this visitor’s presence would be as unwelcome as it was incongruous, Reverend Crawford followed the bag lady through the store with the intent of intervening with security and softening the blow to the woman’s dignity when she was asked to leave. The Reverend’s original interest in this visitor, who presented such a stark contrast to the gracious abundance of the store, changed to incredulity. No one attempted to stop the bag lady as she entered the elegant and pricey Special Occasions Department. Instead, she was greeted warmly by a smartly attired saleswoman.

“Reverend Crawford, eavesdropping from the adjoining fitting room, was astonished at the salesperson’s solicitous responses to the customer. When the customer asked to try on evening dresses, the salesperson brought in gown after gown for the customer’s discriminating inspection. With infinite patience, the salesperson evaluated which were the most flattering and appropriate. When the bag lady left the fitting room, her head was held high and there was a light in her eye. She had been treated like a valuable human being.

“When questioned about her actions by Reverend Crawford, the Nordstrom saleswoman replied, ‘This is what we are here for: to serve and to be kind.’ Reverend Crawford was moved by this act of dignity exhibited in, of all places a department store. In addressing her congregation, she asked, ‘Could we say the same thing about ourselves as church goers? That we’re here to serve and to be kind?’

“The sermon’s message spread far beyond the walls of the church that Sunday morning. The congregation carried the story to friends and associates. The New York Times highlighted the incident and that it had been memorialized in a church reputed for the quality of its preaching. Demand for the sermon was so great that the church eventually sold audiotape copies. Employees in Southern California Nordstrom stores were both humbled and challenged as they listened to the tape. Everyone agreed that the incident represented Nordstrom at its best. This story related in the sermon raised not only customer expectations but also store personnel’s self-expectations. in a culture that asked employees to give their best to customers under all circumstances, the definition of best had just been raised.”

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