Cover of Newsweek

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Cover of Newsweek

Post by Chiyo on Sat Apr 18, 2009 12:48 pm

Has anyone, besides me, seen the cover of NewsweeK?

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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by wontgetfooledagain on Sat Apr 18, 2009 12:53 pm

Interesting Chiyo, have you read it yet?

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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by Chiyo on Sat Apr 18, 2009 1:01 pm

wontgetfooledagain wrote:Interesting Chiyo, have you read it yet?

Not yet. It just caught my eye yesterday... And the first thing that came to my mind was; "This is old news. After all, I'd been talking about it on Bnet for over a year, due to authors/prophets like; Bishop John Shelby Spong, Christine Wicker, David Kinnaman and Malachi Martin.

Anyway, I plan on reading it sometime tomorrow, along with some of the protesting blogs that have already risen in response.

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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by wontgetfooledagain on Sat Apr 18, 2009 1:10 pm

Yes, it most certainly is on the decline. And ironically enough, GWB can be thanked for helping that along.

Rob

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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by Chiyo on Sat Apr 18, 2009 1:56 pm

Okay, okay, okay. I kept telling myself; "I don't have time to read the article today, I've got too much to do."... But I couldn't resist. I went ahead and read it anyway. And much to my delight and great surprise, this article actually did have some NEW news to offer, something significant too. Shocked

Look for yourself;

It was a small detail, a point of comparison buried in the fifth paragraph on the 17th page of a 24-page summary of the 2009 American Religious Identification Survey. But as R. Albert Mohler Jr.—president of the Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, one of the largest on earth—read over the document after its release in March, he was struck by a single sentence. For a believer like Mohler—a starched, unflinchingly conservative Christian, steeped in the theology of his particular province of the faith, devoted to producing ministers who will preach the inerrancy of the Bible and the Gospel of Jesus Christ as the only means to eternal life—the central news of the survey was troubling enough: the number of Americans who claim no religious affiliation has nearly doubled since 1990, rising from 8 to 15 percent. Then came the point he could not get out of his mind: while the unaffiliated have historically been concentrated in the Pacific Northwest, the report said, "this pattern has now changed, and the Northeast emerged in 2008 as the new stronghold of the religiously unidentified." As Mohler saw it, the historic foundation of America's religious culture was cracking.

"That really hit me hard," he told me last week. "The Northwest was never as religious, never as congregationalized, as the Northeast, which was the foundation, the home base, of American religion. To lose New England struck me as momentous." Turning the report over in his mind, Mohler posted a despairing online column on the eve of Holy Week lamenting the decline—and, by implication, the imminent fall—of an America shaped and suffused by Christianity. "A remarkable culture-shift has taken place around us," Mohler wrote. "The most basic contours of American culture have
been radically altered.


Last edited by Chiyo on Sat Apr 18, 2009 1:57 pm; edited 1 time in total
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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by Chiyo on Sat Apr 18, 2009 1:56 pm

Double post. Sorry. Embarassed
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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by ItsAllALie on Sat Apr 18, 2009 2:45 pm

I can't see the image, but the article looks interesting,,,,

I'm rather amazed that the good reverend is so SHOCKED though,,,,New England is coming up in liberal circles,,,,,gay marriage in Mass, Vermont, NY is going to vote,,,,,,,,,I'm sure I'm missing something,,,,
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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by gillyflower on Sat Apr 18, 2009 6:19 pm

Yes, I read it and posted about it only I thought it was Business Week I'd read instead of Newsweek.

I thought it was interesting about the comments made about how it was such a mistake for the Evangelicals to hitch their wagon to the Republican Party and that times like this (fear of change) tends to drive people to more extremes. I saw that in the Sixties. We'll get past it but our culture will be changed. I didn't realize that so many people all around the world were being attracted to Evangelical type churches.

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Re: Cover of Newsweek

Post by Guest on Wed Jul 01, 2009 2:42 am

wontgetfooledagain wrote:Yes, it most certainly is on the decline. And ironically enough, GWB can be thanked for helping that along.

Rob

Actually, Rob, this isn't true. I did read the article, and took particular interest in these three paragraphs.....

While we remain a nation decisively shaped by religious faith, our politics and our culture are, in the main, less influenced by movements and arguments of an explicitly Christian character than they were even five years ago. I think this is a good thing—good for our political culture, which, as the American Founders saw, is complex and charged enough without attempting to compel or coerce religious belief or observance. It is good for Christianity, too, in that many Christians are rediscovering the virtues of a separation of church and state that protects what Roger Williams, who founded Rhode Island as a haven for religious dissenters, called "the garden of the church" from "the wilderness of the world." As crucial as religion has been and is to the life of the nation, America's unifying force has never been a specific faith, but a commitment to freedom—not least freedom of conscience. At our best, we single religion out for neither particular help nor particular harm; we have historically treated faith-based arguments as one element among many in the republican sphere of debate and decision. The decline and fall of the modern religious right's notion of a Christian America creates a calmer political environment and, for many believers, may help open the way for a more theologically serious religious life.

Let's be clear: while the percentage of Christians may be shrinking, rumors of the death of Christianity are greatly exaggerated. Being less Christian does not necessarily mean that America is post-Christian. A third of Americans say they are born again; this figure, along with the decline of politically moderate-to liberal mainline Protestants, led the ARIS authors to note that "these trends … suggest a movement toward more conservative beliefs and particularly to a more 'evangelical' outlook among Christians." With rising numbers of Hispanic immigrants bolstering the Roman Catholic Church in America, and given the popularity of Pentecostalism, a rapidly growing Christian milieu in the United States and globally, there is no doubt that the nation remains vibrantly religious—far more so, for instance, than Europe.

Still, in the new NEWSWEEK Poll, fewer people now think of the United States as a "Christian nation" than did so when George W. Bush was president (62 percent in 2009 versus 69 percent in 2008). Two thirds of the public (68 percent) now say religion is "losing influence" in American society, while just 19 percent say religion's influence is on the rise. The proportion of Americans who think religion "can answer all or most of today's problems" is now at a historic low of 48 percent. During the Bush 43 and Clinton years, that figure never dropped below 58 percent.


As I understand this trend to be, it's a matter of leaving religion out of the polling booths. While clearly a full third of Americans still consider themselves born again Christians, and top that with the other "less fundamental/evangelical believers, such as Catholics who vote, Christianity is not on the down swing, but merely taking a back seat when political decisions need to be made.

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